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VETERAN.

TEACHER.

FARMER.

PHYSICIAN.

I am Joe Yetter. Oregon deserves a Congressperson who represents our core values and long-term interests.  My  values and my experience qualify me to be of service to you.

 

My core values: Liberty, equality, justice, peace, and service above self.

 

I joined the United States Army on September 5, 1968, and retired as a Colonel on January 31, 2004.  My oath to defend the Constitution of the United States from all enemies, foreign and domestic, remains in effect.

 

I went to medical school to save lives. Just as I took an oath to defend our Constitution, I took the Hippocratic oath that obliged me to serve other people to the best of my ability, without regard to my own self-interest.

 

I am proud to have taught hundreds of younger doctors in multiple medical specialties, touching eternity as only a teacher can.

 

As a farmer, I've raised livestock and grown crops. I'm deeply aware of the difficulty in making a financial success of a small farm, of the challenges of water rights, weather, and the vagaries of markets. I love producing healthful food for neighbors and friends.

 

I've served my country, my patients, my students, and my neighbors. Please allow me to serve you.

 

JoeForOregon. For you.

IF YOU PREFER, YOU MAY DONATE TO JOE'S CAMPAIGN BY MAILING A CHECK.

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PLEASE MAIL YOUR DONATION TO:
JOE YETTER COMMITTEE TO ELECT
C/O PIETER VAN DER VORST
533 JASMINE WAY
ROSEBURG, OR 97471

FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THAT YOU INCLUDE YOUR NAME, ADDRESS, OCCUPATION AND EMPLOYER.

PLEASE ALSO INCLUDE YOUR TELEPHONE NUMBER AND EMAIL ADDRESS. THANK YOU.

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Once Upon A Time...


I'm running for Congress, on a platform of shared values, common humanity, and common interests, from the ground up. I hope to learn from you.
Let me tell you a story. It's about Art Robinson and me.
Once upon a time....

The first time I ever met Art Robinson was in 2010. It happened at breakfast, in Karen's Coffee Cup, out Diamond Lake Boulevard, in Roseburg, when Art was first running against Peter DeFazio.
I was a DeFazio supporter, but I really wanted to learn what made Art Robinson tick. Art gave his canned spiel at the beginning of this campaign stop, and then several of us lingered on, to chat, and eventually, just Art and I shared the table.
I looked at his shoes. "Hey," I said, "we wear the same shoes."
Art glanced down, and we both chuckled. We were both wearing white Court Classics.
"Twelve bucks at Costco," Art said.
"Maybe $11.99?" I replied.
Already, quite literally at ground level, Art and I shared a value: frugality. And utter disdain for fashion sense.
I had already noted that Art was an abstemious eater; most everyone else at the tables had enjoyed biscuits and gravy, or pancakes, or eggs. Or all of them.
Art and I just drank coffee. And more coffee. Frugal people drink free refills.


We talked on. Art had been raising sheep for years near Cave Junction; I was struggling with a teeny-tiny farm in Azalea. Art and I both moved around as kids; we both attended segregated schools in Texas (I also went to a segregated school in Louisiana); both of us expressed a passion for liberty, equality and justice. Both of us came from a scientific background, and passionately supported education. In each of these areas, Art and I had drawn different conclusions about what public policy ought to be. But we shared some common values.
I think most of us do. And that's where we must begin.
At that table, over more cups of coffee, Art and I disagreed on policy issue after policy issue. But each of us learned from the other, and we did move toward some common ground on some issues.
We had both suffered personal losses--Art far more grievously than I--and we commiserated. We were human.
Karen's invited us to leave. Quite reasonably.
"I'm going to see you at your next event," I told Art.
"This can't be good," Art said. He already knew that I was a Democrat, and that I would be challenging him on policy issues.


We, both of us, went on to the next event, and the next event, and so on, over that campaign and the next campaign, too.
Art and I didn't always agree; frankly, we seldom agreed on public policy solutions. But there were times that we did agree. I recall that at one campaign event Art emphatically asserted that we had to treat immigrants with respect and dignity, and find a way to allow immigrants who have been here for a long time to have a legal pathway to citizenship. This line drew gasps from many in the Robinson crowd. No, Art told them, emphatically: we had to recognize our common humanity, and treat people decently.


Art thought (or had thought) that HIV did not cause AIDS; that public schools should be abolished. And, ditto, that Social Security and Medicare should be "phased out." He lamented that we could not add radioactive waste from San Onofre to our drinking water.
I thought that each of those positions was nuts. And Art called people who disagreed with him, "Stark Raving Mad."


Fast forward a dozen years.
Now, with redistricting, Art Robinson has become my State Senator. I'm running for Congress in Oregon's Congressional District 2, and I hope that I will become Art's Congressional Representative after the election in November.
A few years ago, Art invited me to come down to look at his place in Cave Junction. I happily agreed, but shortly thereafter, Art and I got into some vehement policy disagreement, and he disinvited me. We were kinda rude to each other.
I regret that. I regret every opportunity lost to learn more about people. their values, hopes and dreams. I regret everything I said or may have said about Art Robinson personally; I believe most of his policy ideas are deeply flawed, but Art views people humanely, and has recently denounced the Oregon GOP resolution that falsely called the January 6th insurrection a false flag event.
Over the coming months, I'm going to be listening to the people of my district.
I hope to connect always at a values-based level, and I hope to learn from all of you.